Search Results: Coordinated Services

 

The following documents and links are contributions from the SpecialQuest Community and do not necessarily reflect the position of the SpecialQuest Birth-Five: Head Start/Hilton Foundation Training Program, Napa County Office of Education, or the Funder, and no official endorsement should be inferred.

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Resources on Working with Children Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired or Deafblind | (.doc 35kb) Submitted by Tom Miller 2/08/10

An annotated list of resources for working with children who are blind, visually impaired, or deafblind from the Perkins School for the Blind in MA. Includes excellent professional development resources, including multimedia training modules; information on literacy; advocacy; service design; etc.

 

www.parentsreachingout.org | Submitted by Tawnya Sanchez 04/23/09

Valuable information for families regarding early intervention, IEP (Individualized Education Plan), Healthcare Access, NCLB, Parental/Family Involvement, Parent to Parent Support, etc.

 

Head Start Memorandum of Agreement | Submitted by Dayana Garcia 04/23/09

Each Head Start regional and state administrator, in collaboration with their Part B and Part C agencies, seeks to develop a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) or Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for each state. This interactive map allow administrators, TA Providers, staff and parents to locate states that have developed these agreements which include guidelines and roles and responsibilities of the participating agencies and/or individuals.

 

SpecialQuest Multimedia Training Library Suggestions for Inclusion Into CDA Training Sessions | (.doc 52kb) Submitted by Christy Thompson 04/18/09

This is a matrix that contains ways to incorporate the SpecialQuest Multimedia Training Library (SQMTL) into topics being addressed at CDA trainings by a Head Start program in Wyoming.

 

Mental Health Modules | (.doc 101kb) Submitted by Christy Thompson 04/18/09

This is a matrix that contains ways to incorporate the SpecialQuest Multimedia Training Library (SQMTL) into topics being addressed at Mental Health trainings by a Head Start program in Wyoming.

 

Suggestions for Inclusion of SpecialQuest Multimedia Training Library for Pre-service Trainings and Other Training Sessions | (.doc 37kb) Submitted by Christy Thompson 04/18/09

This is a summary of SpecialQuest Approach descriptions that were provided to a Head Start program in Wyoming to implement as they see fit.

 

http://www.cainclusivechildcare.org | Submitted by Laurie Clark 03/26/09

California Map to Inclusive Child Care is a source for information and resources on inclusive child care for children with special needs. The web address has many resources including power points ready for training purposes on: Early Start, Transition and When Concerns Arise. Questions can be submitted regarding inclusive practices and a Technical Assistance Specialist will respond.

 

www.floortime.org | Submitted by Deborah Conn 4/07/2007

About the Floortime video training series (quoted from the Web site): Parents of children with relating and communicating disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders, can now learn at home how to help their children master the basics of relating and communicating. Meant to supplement the child’s work with professionals, the Floortime DVD Training Series shows parents how to use the Floortime approach to help their child relate and communicate. The series was developed by acclaimed child development experts Stanley I. Greenspan MD and Serena Wieder, PhD, creators of the DIR® approach for children with autism and other special needs. The method, known more familiarly as Floortime, encourages parents to get down on the floor with their child, following his lead and natural interests in play, entering his world to help him connect with others.

 

National Childrens Aliance | Submitted by Maria Pfeifer 4/07/2007

The National Children's Alliance is a group of concerned citizens and organizations that work on behalf of children in their Counties. Go to their web site and you can find one closest to you. It's worth becomming a part of since they cover a variety of issues about children such as, safety, nutrition, health, dental, bullying etc... You never know what you have in the group until you join. My group has a Family Court Judge, Local Newspaper, Doctors, Lawyers, Sheriff's Office, Police Department, Church Leaders a couple of Senators and so forth.

 

Freecycle | Submitted by Maria Pfeifer 4/05/2007

If you go to the freecycle home page, you can find a freecycle group in your area. This is a group who would rather pass on items that they no longer want or need instead of sending it to the landfills. You can also post items that are needed. I have seen cribs, clothing, furniture, computers, TV's etc... that have been passed on from one person to someone else who is in need. Everything on this is FREE.

 

The Florida Kinship Center | Submitted by Maria Pfeifer 4/05/2007

The Kinship Care program provides a warmline for the State of Florida where Kinship Caregivers can call to recieve support and information as to support groups and services that are availible in their County. The number is 1-800-640-6444. If you go to the website, there is a downloadable legal handbook on the rights of Kinship Caregivers. They also sponser a trip every year to Tallahasse called Grand Rally in Tally where they get to talk to the politicians about issues of concern for Kinship Caregivers. They also have a newsletter they send out by email that keeps you up to date.

 

http://www.communityweaving.org | Submited by Susan Stewart 3/28/2007

Community Weaving is a innovative approach to foster a community of responsible citizens who create Family Support Networks where they share their time, gifts, talents and resources with others. This community mobilization strategy increases civic engagement and social capital by tapping grass root resources resulting in the creation of healthy thriving communities. Family Support Networks meet the needs of families and children in the old fashioned way, neighbor to neighbor. Through the use of telephones and a web-based technology families can easily and immediately access a myriad of resources to help themselves and others in the community.

 

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